Amanda.
Heterotrophic diurnal bipded.

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etsy

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yourveryowncemetery:

"Dutch Love"

"Dutch Lover"

Ashley Woodson Bailey

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princessandtheprep:

This is one of the most insulting things that I have ever seen, it makes me so mad I actually want to cry. I can’t believe magazines think that they can just dip a woman in brown paint, give her clothes from my culture to put on for a couple hours and then have audacity to call her an “African Queen”. Growing up I heard every joke about Africans and saw the negative stereotypes portrayed by the media that tried to make me feel so bad about where I come from. Yet Ive noticed when fashion magazine want to do spreads portraying poise and exoticness they often turn to Africa ( and many other foreign continents/nations) proving time and again that Africa is more than the negative images you see in the media)  but this time, to try and take parts of my beautiful culture just to have white women play the role of an “African Queen” proves that beauty cannot be seen in our countries/cultures unless it is represented by White people. 

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mindblowingscience:

Climate Change Affects Shark Swimming in Strange Way

Sharks exposed to ocean water acidified by too much carbon dioxide alter their behavior, swimming in longer spurts than sharks in typical ocean water, particularly during their nighttime wanderings.
The new findings, published today (Sept. 16) in the journal Biology Letters, are troubling, given that one effect of the human consumption of fossil fuels is to make ocean water more acidic. If fossil fuel burning continues as is, sharks may face even more challenges than they do today — when a quarter of species are already at risk of extinction.

"Usually when you expose a fish to some kind of environmental stressor, they usually acclimate to that stressor, and that makes them less vulnerable to that stressor," said study researcher Fredrik Jutfelt, an animal physiologist at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. "But here, it seemed like this high CO2 [carbon dioxide] continued to be a stressor to these sharks for quite a long time."
Acidifying oceans
The world’s oceans absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, a process that decreases the pH (a measure of how acidic or basic a substance is) of ocean water, turning it more acidic. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the pH of ocean surface water has fallen by 0.1 on the 14-point scale since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. That drop on the pH scale translates to surface water that’s 30 percent more acidic than before.
Today, ocean water has a pH of about 8.1, Jutfelt told Live Science, and the atmosphere contains about 400 parts per million of carbon dioxide. If humans continue to load the atmosphere with carbon, this concentration is expected to rise to about 1,000 parts per million by 2100. In that scenario, the pH of ocean water is expected to drop to about 7.7 or 7.8.  The pH scale runs from 0 (most acidic) to 14 (most basic), with a pH of 7 being neutral.
Studies of bony fishes have found that some species react catastrophically to acidified water, while others are quite tolerant, Jutfelt said. But hardly anyone had examined the effects of ocean acidification on sharks and rays, fish known for their cartilaginous bones.
Strange swimming
Jutfelt and his colleague Leon Green, also of the University of Gothenburg, borrowed 20 small-spotted catsharks (Scyliorhinus canicula), from a local aquarium. This small, common bottom-dweller is found throughout the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. They put half of the sharks in tanks filled with typical ocean water with a pH of 8.1, and half in tanks filled with acidified ocean water with a pH of about 7.7 for four weeks.
After this period, the researchers tested the sharks on a variety of physiological responses and behaviors, including their blood pH and oxygen consumption rates. They also took video of the sharks at night, when these nocturnal animals are most active.
Although the CO2-exposed sharks’ metabolisms were normal, the researchers found more sodium and bicarbonate ions in their blood, apparently a molecular adjustment made to keep the sharks’ blood pH stable in the more-acidic water. Most strikingly, however, was the discovery that the sharks in the acidified water exhibited odd nighttime behavior.
"The control sharks, they would have these many starts and stops throughout the night. They would swim for a few seconds, or up to a minute, maybe, and then stop,” Jutfelt said. “But the CO2-exposed sharks, they kept swimming for longer time periods. Some of them swam for an hour continuously.”
This continuous swimming behavior could have been a result of altered ion concentrations in the brain, Jutfelt said. Alternatively, the sharks could have sensed that the water was too acidic and kept swimming in hopes of finding better-quality water elsewhere. Surprisingly, Jutfelt said, the sharks kept up this behavior change four to six weeks after first being introduced to the acidified water.
"They don’t seem to be able to completely acclimate," he said.
Jutfelt and his colleagues aren’t yet sure what the behavior change would mean for sharks in the wild. But sharks reproduce slowly, often taking years to reach sexual maturity. That means there are few generations of sharks between today’s and the sharks that will likely be exposed to 7.7-pH ocean water by the year 2100. 
"They basically don’t have that many generations before we reach those CO2 levels, so we don’t think evolution will be able to have a major effect and produce tolerance," Jutfelt said. "Which is why any problem with sharks might be more alarming than with other organisms."

mindblowingscience:

Climate Change Affects Shark Swimming in Strange Way

Sharks exposed to ocean water acidified by too much carbon dioxide alter their behavior, swimming in longer spurts than sharks in typical ocean water, particularly during their nighttime wanderings.

The new findings, published today (Sept. 16) in the journal Biology Letters, are troubling, given that one effect of the human consumption of fossil fuels is to make ocean water more acidic. If fossil fuel burning continues as is, sharks may face even more challenges than they do today — when a quarter of species are already at risk of extinction.

"Usually when you expose a fish to some kind of environmental stressor, they usually acclimate to that stressor, and that makes them less vulnerable to that stressor," said study researcher Fredrik Jutfelt, an animal physiologist at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. "But here, it seemed like this high CO2 [carbon dioxide] continued to be a stressor to these sharks for quite a long time."

Acidifying oceans

The world’s oceans absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, a process that decreases the pH (a measure of how acidic or basic a substance is) of ocean water, turning it more acidic. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the pH of ocean surface water has fallen by 0.1 on the 14-point scale since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. That drop on the pH scale translates to surface water that’s 30 percent more acidic than before.

Today, ocean water has a pH of about 8.1, Jutfelt told Live Science, and the atmosphere contains about 400 parts per million of carbon dioxide. If humans continue to load the atmosphere with carbon, this concentration is expected to rise to about 1,000 parts per million by 2100. In that scenario, the pH of ocean water is expected to drop to about 7.7 or 7.8.  The pH scale runs from 0 (most acidic) to 14 (most basic), with a pH of 7 being neutral.

Studies of bony fishes have found that some species react catastrophically to acidified water, while others are quite tolerant, Jutfelt said. But hardly anyone had examined the effects of ocean acidification on sharks and rays, fish known for their cartilaginous bones.

Strange swimming

Jutfelt and his colleague Leon Green, also of the University of Gothenburg, borrowed 20 small-spotted catsharks (Scyliorhinus canicula), from a local aquarium. This small, common bottom-dweller is found throughout the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. They put half of the sharks in tanks filled with typical ocean water with a pH of 8.1, and half in tanks filled with acidified ocean water with a pH of about 7.7 for four weeks.

After this period, the researchers tested the sharks on a variety of physiological responses and behaviors, including their blood pH and oxygen consumption rates. They also took video of the sharks at night, when these nocturnal animals are most active.

Although the CO2-exposed sharks’ metabolisms were normal, the researchers found more sodium and bicarbonate ions in their blood, apparently a molecular adjustment made to keep the sharks’ blood pH stable in the more-acidic water. Most strikingly, however, was the discovery that the sharks in the acidified water exhibited odd nighttime behavior.

"The control sharks, they would have these many starts and stops throughout the night. They would swim for a few seconds, or up to a minute, maybe, and then stop,” Jutfelt said. “But the CO2-exposed sharks, they kept swimming for longer time periods. Some of them swam for an hour continuously.”

This continuous swimming behavior could have been a result of altered ion concentrations in the brain, Jutfelt said. Alternatively, the sharks could have sensed that the water was too acidic and kept swimming in hopes of finding better-quality water elsewhere. Surprisingly, Jutfelt said, the sharks kept up this behavior change four to six weeks after first being introduced to the acidified water.

"They don’t seem to be able to completely acclimate," he said.

Jutfelt and his colleagues aren’t yet sure what the behavior change would mean for sharks in the wild. But sharks reproduce slowly, often taking years to reach sexual maturity. That means there are few generations of sharks between today’s and the sharks that will likely be exposed to 7.7-pH ocean water by the year 2100. 

"They basically don’t have that many generations before we reach those CO2 levels, so we don’t think evolution will be able to have a major effect and produce tolerance," Jutfelt said. "Which is why any problem with sharks might be more alarming than with other organisms."

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17000dollars:

17000dollars:

i want the kind of funding that scientists in comic books have.  where are you getting this money?  do you publish papers or do you just turn people into giant lizards and call it a day?  do you have to get that shit peer reviewed?  who is paying for your research?  can you give me their email address 

i have googled ‘evil science grants’ and the results were not satisfying

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Yay, picked this and it was ripe to the rind! It tastes and smells delish! 🍈👌#gardening

Yay, picked this and it was ripe to the rind! It tastes and smells delish! 🍈👌#gardening

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asylum-art:

Emir Šehanović

Emir Šehanović is an artist hailing from Bosnia-Herzegovina who uses digitally manipulated images and vintage photos in a collage-like format to create these very unique figurative pieces. For his work, Šehanović will use both traditional collage mediums as well as combining digital techniques to achieve the particular look and emotion in his pieces.

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completelylostprincess:

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

This is so beautiful.

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fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Adding just a few polymers to a liquid can substantially change its behavior. The presence of polymers turns otherwise Newtonian fluids like water into viscoelastic fluids. When deformed, viscoelastic fluids have a response that is part viscous—like other fluids—and part elastic—like a rubber band that regains its initial shape. The collage above shows what happens to a thinning column of a viscoelastic fluid. Instead of breaking into a stream of droplets, the liquid forms drop connected with a thin filament, like beads on a string. In a Newtonian fluid, surface tension would tend to break off the drops at their narrowest point, but stretching the polymers in the viscoelastic fluid provides just enough normal stress to keep the filament intact. If the effect looks familiar, it may be because you’ve seen it in the mirror. Human saliva is a viscoelastic liquid! (Image credit: A. Wagner et al.)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Adding just a few polymers to a liquid can substantially change its behavior. The presence of polymers turns otherwise Newtonian fluids like water into viscoelastic fluids. When deformed, viscoelastic fluids have a response that is part viscous—like other fluids—and part elastic—like a rubber band that regains its initial shape. The collage above shows what happens to a thinning column of a viscoelastic fluid. Instead of breaking into a stream of droplets, the liquid forms drop connected with a thin filament, like beads on a string. In a Newtonian fluid, surface tension would tend to break off the drops at their narrowest point, but stretching the polymers in the viscoelastic fluid provides just enough normal stress to keep the filament intact. If the effect looks familiar, it may be because you’ve seen it in the mirror. Human saliva is a viscoelastic liquid! (Image credit: A. Wagner et al.)

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